Grass

…Forage uses may vary by category…

Description

Grass is essential for a healthy, well balanced TMR. University studies continually re-enforce this point. Moreover, grasses are endorsed by top dairy nutritionists. Grass adds digestible fiber, high in sugars and nutrition, for optimum dietary intake. The dramatic results that grasses have achieved in the World forage Super Bowl for the last few years have confirmed what we, at Byron Seeds, already knew, that grass is essential to a healthy ration. Grass in a TMR makes economic sense. There is no better way to boost herd health, maintain milk production , and to reduce the cost of inputs. Byron Seed LLC has put together grass mixes that work well alone of blended with alfalfas.

Nutritional Benefits of Grass

  1. The NDFd (fiber digestibility) is much higher in grass, (55% – 75%), than in alfalfa, (40% – 55%), even
  2. The sugars in high quality grass are very beneficial to the microbes in the cow’s rumen.
  3. Adding grass to cow’s ration helps maintain body condition, herd health and longevity.
  4. The key is to plant late maturing grasses which can be easily harvested in a vegetative state.
  5. The protein in high quality alfalfa degrades so fast that the cow’s liver is overloaded by it. This may cause problems such as ketosis, fatty liver, twisted stomachs, etc. Grass helps prevent this.

Showing 1–12 of 100 results

  • Brassicas

    Brassicas (8)

    Forage Use: Grazing Dairy, Beef, Horses, and Sheep

    Forage brassicas are a broad family covering everything from purple top turnips to kale. These plants readily cross with each other and most of the varieties we sell are actually crosses between turnips and forage rape. Brassicas see most usage as 'emergency forage' in drought years, but they can be used to provide forage any time from spring through winter. Early maturing forage rapes can be ready to graze in as few as 45 while kales may take over 100 days. Dry matter accumulation in turnips, in October, is similar to that of a corn crop in August. The diversity in brassicas is a strength we can use on most farms to provide excellent forage in specific times of the year.

    Establishment

    Brassicas can be planted late spring to early fall. Allow at least 45 days of growth before you plan to use the forage. For multiple grazings, plant in late spring. Plant in the early fall for single late fall or early winter grazing, similar to stockpiling fescue. Brassicas can be no-tilled or drilled into firm seedbed in conventional tillage and should be seeded at 1/4 to 1/2 inch deep. Weed pressure needs to be suppressed for up to two weeks after emergence. Seed can be broadcast and incorporated by cultipacking. Brassicas will smother out most weeds once they are established. They can be successfully no-till seeded at a lower rate into established pastures. Brassicas are not well adapted to wet or poorly drained soils.

    Management

    Since brassicas are very high in crude protein and energy and low in fiber, animals may need some roughage in the form of dry hay or mature pasture if they are eating pure stands of brassicas. Mixing the brassicas with oats or sudangrass can solve the problem as well. Excessive fertilization of both nitrogen and potassium should be avoided. Usually 50 units of N is enough to grow a wonderful crop of brassicas. They are very good at recycling nutrients left by previous crops. A good practice is to prevent brassica consumption in dairy animals two hours prior to milking to prevent off-flavors in the milk.

  • Bromegrass

    Bromegrass (4)

    Forage Use: Grazing Dairy, Beef, Horses, Sheep, Haylage, and Dry Hay

    There are at least three major families of bromegrass: Smooth, Meadow and Mountain or Alaskan. However, only two of these, Meadow and Mountain, have been improved by European breeding programs. Improved bromegrass is quick to establish and provides a high quality, high yielding forage that works well as a companion with alfalfa. 

    Establishment

    Recommended seeding depth is 1/2" and seeding rates of 25-35 lbs/Acre or 10-20 lbs/Acre in mixes. Brome grasses have larger seed size than other grasses so attention to drill calibration is important. The growth patterns of Brome grasses, in general, do well when planted as a companion with alfalfa.

    Management

    Bromegrass requires high fertility levels and well-drained soils. Bromes will persist if allowed to go to seed once every season.

  • Festulolium

    Festulolium (4)

    Forage Use: Grazing Dairy, Beef, Sheep, and Haylage

    Festulolium is a cross between perennial or italian ryegrass and meadow fescue. There are thousands of ways to cross, consequently many mediocre festuloliums - but these are the best available in the world.

    Establishment

    Seed size is identical in size and weight with tall fescue and they mix well together without separating. Seeding rate as a nurse crop with tall fescue and alfalfa is between 2 to 3 lbs per acre. For pastures in the upper Midwest, we use 5 lbs per acre. For a pure stand the seeding rate is the same as tall fescue. This is not commonly done as stand life is approximately 3 years with the first year being the most productive and declining from there on. However this characteristic with its fast establishment makes it an excellent nurse crop for alfalfa and tall fescue.

    Management

    Festulolium fertilizer requirement are intermediate between ryegrass and tall fescue.

  • Forage Sorghum

    Forage Sorghum (7)

    Forage Use: Haylage

    Highest producer of biomass of the summer cover crops.

    Energy from sugar? We’re talking sugar cane for cows, known as silage sorghum. Energy from digestible fiber? We’re definitely talking about gene 6 BMR Forage Sorghum! BMR Gene 6 is a naturally bred-in trait and is non-GMO.

    Alta brand forage sorghums offer dairy and livestock producers an alternative to corn silage and multi-cut sorghum sudans. Alta brand forage sorghums are selected for high nutritional and agronomic benefits for today’s livestock producer. The BMR 6 genetics vault sorghum into the realm of super star forages for maximum fiber digestibility and increased palatability, making escellent dairy feed. We offer forage sorghum with maturity ranges from 83 day up to 110 days. Alta offers brachytic dwarf and male sterile products, the brachytic dwarf characteristics make sorghum an agronomically sound crop. (It can stay standing up until harvest.)  Energy levels are comparable to corn and protein level is around 10 to 12%. It is more efficient than corn, much less expensive to plant than corn, as well as higher yielding than corn in the southern Midwest, additional forage sorghum vs corn comparisons.

    • Yields similar to corn silage
    • 30% less nutrient (nitrogen) requirements than corn silage
    • 30%-50% less water requirements than corn silage
    • Productive on marginal soils
    • Drought and heat tolerant, won't shut down until 105 degrees
    • Later planting with similar tonnages as corn silage
    • Minimal mycotoxin concerns
    • No root worm or corn borer concerns
    • Reduce soil phosphorus loads
    • Less seed cost per acre than corn

    Establishment

    Sorghum Sudan will usually need about ten days to emerge, and then can grow 3" to 6" per day. A conventional or no-till drill is used for the seeding and planting depth should be 1" to 1 1/2".  Plant when the soil temperatures are at least 60 degrees at a rate of 25-40 lbs/Acre. Planting after a small grain crop (e.g. rye or Triticale) requires dealing with the allelopathic effects from the dying grain plants (minimum tillage or heavy liquid manure application). Weed management should be dealt with pre-planting as there are no herbicides available for Sorghum-Sudan grasses. Sowing at higher rates, 70 lbs or more, makes an excellent smother crop for fields with weed problems. Use them as part of a double crop program, to thicken up thinning alfalfa fields or to rotate out a weak or undesirable pasture. When following with a fall forage such as Italian ryegrass, alfalfa or pasture, we recommend disking the crop down in late August to early September to insure a good start for the next crop. 

    Management

    Sorghum Sudan will be harvested for baleage or haylage in 45 days after planting. Grazing is usually initiated a week to 10 days earlier. Growth of Sorghum Sudan is very rapid once it reaches 2 feet tall or so. Rates of 4 inches a day are common. The taller varieties (AS6401, AS6501) are mowed when they reach 38" to 40" tall and the dwarf (AS6402) when it reaches 32". Residue heights are also important. The taller versions must be mowed at 5-6" residue (above the 2nd growth node) to allow for rapid regrowth. AS6402 can be mowed at 3" and is one reason for its popularity. These cutting heights are essential as regrowth can be almost zero if the residual is too short.  For haylage, longer chop length is needed for effective fiber. 

    Fertilization Utilizes manure nutrients very well. P, K, and other nutrients similar to corn silage. Fertilizer needs are 1 to 1 1/4 units of N per growing day, i.e. 45 to 50 units for first cut and 30-35 units for each cut thereafter. Potassium, phosphorous and sulfur are also needed on most farms. All fertilizer needs are the equivalent of the needs for 100 bushel corn. Manure can be used for the original application; however, commercial N is the best source after a cutting. If manure will be used after the first cut, choose AS6401, due to its superior disease package. We usually recommend to apply manure prior to seeding. Nitrogen needs for grazed sorghum Sudan are reduced proportionally so that cows can be brought in to graze earlier without danger of nitrate (NO3) poisoning. (See article on sorghum nutrition for more on NO3 and Prussic acid plus management of the crop after freezing weather.) If crop is light green or yellowish, either not enough nitrogen is available or soil conditions are too wet.

    When mowing, make a wide swath to remove water as quickly as possible. Wide swathing makes a huge difference with Sorghum Sudan. Cutting Sorghum Sudan places a lot of material on the ground. For fastest drying, use a conditioner and spread the swath as wide as possible. Use a tedder to facilitate wilt.

  • Kentucky Bluegrass

    Kentucky Bluegrass (3)

    Forage Use: Grazing Dairy, Beef, Horses, Sheep, Haylage, and Dry Hay

    Native bluegrass is one of the most common species in pastures. It is a short, very dense with dark green leaves with “boat” shaped leaf tips. Native varieties can take over heavily grazed pastures. Improved varieties are more manageable and highly palatable, except at the advanced-maturity stage. Bluegrass spreads with rhizomes to form a sod and is very persistent under heavy grazing. This feature makes Kentucky bluegrass highly suitable for horse pastures.

    Establishment

    Slow to establish with a 21-28 day germination period. Plant at 1/8 to 1/4 inch depth in a very firm seed bed. Spreads rapidly after establishment because of the rhizomatous nature.

    Management

    Typically, 70% of bluegrass production is before June. Therefore, early heavy grazing prevents over mature, low quality forage. Keeping a stubble height at 3 to 4 inches encourages proper regrowth.

  • Lawn Turf

    Lawn Turf (3)

    Barenbrug knows the sod industry, knows that these are among the most particular and demanding of customers we have. Sod growers must have high quality seed. It must be of superb genetic make-up to create a remarkable sod product. Seed purity and germination specifications must be superior. Farmers lose money when weeds or other species show up in their product. For these reasons, Barenbrug built its own blending and bagging line specifically for sod customers. There is no compromise in our sod blends.

    Our comprehensive research program focuses on better quality sod and producing a faster developing product. This focus has helped us increase profits for our customers and for their customers. The significance of using Barenbrug seed to create a superior sod has helped benefit the entire value-chain. For fine fescue, ryegrass, bluegrass or tall fescue sod, Barenbrug is a trusted seed resource.

    Part of Barenbrug’s commitment to the sod industry is through our membership in the Turf Producers International (TPI).

  • Meadow Fescue

    Meadow Fescue (6)

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    Of all the different grass species, meadow fescue has one of the broadest ranges of application. From dry hay to pasture, from heavy soils to light, meadow fescue can provide good tonnage and excellent quality. Meadow fescue is a semibunch type, cool season, European grass that has great winter hardiness. It will yield slightly less than tall fescue and orchard grass but has better fiber digestibility and palatability for grazing applications.

    Establishment

    Meadow fescue will establish faster than tall fescue or orchardgrass but will still benefit from a nurse crop. Seeding depth should be between 0.25 and 0.5 inches or when planted with a legume, 0.25 inches is preferred. Use a low rate of a small grain or combine with festulolium or ryegrass to help suppress weeds. Meadow fescue is a good no-till option but will not express itself until the following year.

    Management

    Meadow fescue needs fertile soils for optimum performance. They work well in intensively managed grazing or hay production if not mowed lower than 3 inches.

  • Millet

    Millet (1)

    Forage Use: Haylage

    Description

    This is a warm season annual, similar to sorghum sudans, with no prussic acid. Dry matter production 20 percent less than sorghum sudans, with better digestibility and protein.

    Management

    Millet has smaller seeds, thus a lower seeding rate. It needs a soil temperature of 65 degrees or more to germinate, and growth slows down when cool weather comes (September). Frost kills it but it can still be grazed with no fear of prussic acid. Will tolerate wetter years better than Sudan.

  • Miscelaneous Grasses

    Miscelaneous Grasses (1)

    Forage Use: Grazing Dairy, Beef, Horses, Sheep, Haylage, and Dry Hay

    ...Forage uses may vary...

  • Orchard Grass

    Orchard Grass (11)

    Forage Use: Grazing Dairy, Beef, Horses, Sheep, Haylage, and Dry Hay

    Orchardgrass is a perennial, cool-season bunchgrass best suited for fertile, light to medium soils with good drainage. It can persist on moderately poor drained soils. Orchardgrass has good winterhardiness, tolerance to shade and moderate tolerance to drought. It is an excellent choice for pasture, hay, greenchop or silage and is well adapted to grow with legumes such as clover and alfalfa. There is typically a 10 to 20 day spread in heading date between early and late maturing varieties. Use a later heading variety as a companion to alfalfa.

    Establishment

    Orchardgrass can be planted either in early spring or late summer depending on area of country being grown. Orchardgrass is suited for light to medium soils with good drainage. Seeding depth is generally .25 to .50 inches in a firm seed bed. Rolling or using a cultipacker after seeding ensures even germination and emergence.

    Management

    Orchardgrass is very responsive to fertilizer and aftermath production can be excellent with proper fertility and split N applications. For optimum 1st harvest yield and quality, orchardgrass should be harvested in early-mid boot stage at a cutting height of 3 to 4 inches so it can recover quickly and persistence can be maintained. For grazing, excellent grazing management is required to maintain  ersistence and productivity. Graze to 3 to 4 inches and rest 28 days in between rotations. Orchardgrass does not persist well under continuous grazing.

  • Ryegrass

    Ryegrass (22)

    Forage Use: Grazing Dairy, Beef, Horses, Sheep, Haylage, and Dry Hay

    ...Forage uses may vary...

  • Sorghum Sudan

    Sorghum Sudan (12)

    Forage Use: Haylage

    Highest producer of biomass of the summer cover crops.

    These warm season annuals can produce lots of forage in a short period of time during the summer months. Heat, moisture and fertility will make them very productive. When moisture is short they will wait for the rain. Our newer varieties will change the way you think about this excellent low cost crop. They can be grazed or made for silage or balage. Use them as part of a double crop program, to thicken up thinning alfalfa fields or to rotate out a weak or undesirable pasture. When following with a fall forage such as Italian ryegrass, alfalfa or pasture, we recommend disking the crop down in late August to early September to insure a good start for the next crop. Most grazing farms should have a percentage of their farm in sorghum sudangrass to help fill in the summer slump when the cool season pasture is slowing down.

    Establishment

    Seed 25-60 lbs/A at a depth of 3/4 to 1 1/4 inches. Plant when the soil temperatures are at least 60 degrees. Sowing at higher rates, 70 lbs or more, makes an excellent smother crop for fields with weed problems.

    Management

    Fertilization Utilizes manure nutrients very well. P, K, and other nutrients similar to corn silage. Apply manure prior to seeding. Total nitrogen requirements for Sorghum Sudan are 1 ¼ units of N per growing day. Commercial nitrogen is best between cuttings. Manure applications between cuttings can cause severe stand thinning due to wheel traffic and potential crop disease problems. If crop is light green or yellowish, either not enough nitrogen is available or soil conditions are too wet. Harvest Height 32” to 44” is ideal and will increase the root mass five to eight times compared to unmowed sorghum sudans. . Leave 6 inch stubble (4” for Summer Dream) height for regrowth. When mowing, make a wide swath to remove water as quickly as possible. Wide swathing makes a huge difference with Sorghum Sudan. Growth of Sorghum Sudan is very rapid once it reaches 2 feet tall or so. Rates of 4 inches a day are common. To avoid missing your harvest window, we recommend putting a post with a bright flag in an area of the field so that crop height can be easily observed on a daily basis. Harvest Methods Grazing, Balage, and Haylage. For haylage, longer chop length is needed for effective fiber. Cutting Sorghum Sudan places a lot of material on the ground. For fastest drying, use a conditioner and spread the swath as wide as possible. Use a tedder to facilitate wilt. It winter kills easily and, because it's a succulent, breaks down well through the winter.

  • Tall Fescue

    Tall Fescue (11)

    Forage Use: Grazing Dairy, Beef, Horses, Sheep, Haylage, and Dry Hay

    Tall fescue can grow in wet conditions well but is also very drought tolerant. On dairy farms tall fescue is a fabulous addition to the hay portfolio and on beef operations in the Midwest it remains the foundation of pasture systems. In the past number of years, tall fescue has made many appearances at the World Dairy Expo Forage Super Bowl! While tall fescue has long been thought of as a Southern grass, more recently it has shown it can thrive in Wisconsin and Minnesota! Our suppliers are heavily invested in tall fescue breeding programs and bring us a wide selection of varieties for the various situations we face throughout the Midwest.

    Establishment

    Tall fescue is fairly easy to establish, but remember, a good seed bed is at the heart of excellent stands of hay or pasture. It can be no-tilled into existing alfalfa stands (.25 to .50 inches deep) immediately after harvest. (Talk to your dealer about the proper timing for your area.) When seeding in a prepared seed bed, make sure sufficient packing has been done before and after seed is put down. Also, 20 to 30 units of N at seeding is necessary for a faster establishment.

    Management

    Tall fescue can be planted with alfalfa, with grass hay mixes, or simply in mono-culture for hay or pasture systems. Remember that tall fescue, like most cool season grasses, stores 90% of food for regrowth after harvest in the bottom 2 to 2.5 inches of the stem. This means that for maximum growth and production at least 3 to 4 inches of stubble should remain after harvest. Also, for top yield, we recommend 1 to 1.5 lbs of available N for each day of growth. Tall fescue can tolerate less than ideal fertility but, like most crops, it gives best yield and quality in balanced soils. Tall fescue is the best grass for stockpile grazing.

    Note: All varieties are endophyte free (except BarOptima).

  • Teff

    Teff (2)

    Forage Use:  Haylage and Dry Hay

    Description

    Teff is a warm season C4 annual grass that originated in Africa, where it is utilized mainly as a grain crop. An evaluation of the crop in the US has identified it as an excellent forage hay when cut before grain maturity. Tiffany was recently identified as one of the better forage producing lines of Teff. It produces high yields and quality, very similar to Timothy. Teff is a fine stemmed annual grass similar in appearance to bunch grass. It has large crowns and numerous tillers with a shallow massive fibrous root system. Plant height at maturity can range from 3 – 4 feet depending on the environment. Although, there is a lot of selecting and research going on, Byron Seeds is observing this work and trying to find the best suited variety for the Midwest.

    Establishment

    Applications of 50-60 lb. of available N at planting is recommended.  Teff can be cultivated on a wide range of soils and environments, tolerating both drought and water logged conditions. Broadcast Planting using a Brillion grass seeder and cultipacker combination, or a spinner type grass seeder is optimal. If row planting is used, row-spacing should be very narrow to allow for stronger weed competition.

    Management

    The advantage of Teff is its ability to produce high quality hay in a relatively short growing season. Teff has an initial slow growth until a good root system has been established. Herbicide programs for Teff would be similar to other annual grasses or cereal grains. Small applications of N following each cut will enhance yields of later cuts. Moderate amounts of Phosphorous and in some cases sulfur maybe required. Excessive fertilization should be avoided to prevent lodging. Harvest before maturity for optimal quality feed. Cutting interval is generally 40-45 days, but may vary. Currently, there are several Teff varieties being sold, with very little difference in them.

  • Timothy

    Timothy (5)

    Forage Use: Haylage/Balage and Dry Hay

    Known for its palatability and superior winterhardiness, timothy is the latest heading of all cool season perennials. It is well suited as dry cow hay due its low uptake of minerals such as potassium. It makes excellent horse hay. Timothy has a shallow root system allowing great spring production with poor performance in the heat and drought. However,  it does well on heavy, wet, and peaty soils. The small bulb at the base stores nutrients giving it persistence through the drought and heat periods.

    Establishment

    Timothy can be spring or late summer planted. It needs to be planted into a very firm seedbed keeping the depth 1/8 to 1/4 inches. It is slow to establish so control weed pressure and leave 4 to 6 weeks from seeding date to summer drought for spring plantings and the same period before frost for fall plantings. In the South, timothy is often Fall planted as a cover crop, harvested or grazed in the spring and then killed off to make way for spring crops.

    Management

    Choose an earlier heading variety when combining with alfalfa because timothy will not tolerate harvest during the jointing (stem elongation) and early heading stages. Keep the cutting height 3 to 4 inches for stand persistence. Does not graze well. Use a late heading variety for grazing. It tolerates mechanical harvest well, with proper fertility. Fall cuttings  hould be early enough to allow carbohydrate reserves to be replenished. An early application of N will significantly boost production.

  • AF7101 85 Day

    $2.93 per lb
    Total (50 lbs): $146.50

    AF7101 85 Day Forage Sorghum Seed from Alta Seeds has good standability and superior digestibility a good double crop. Buy yours here!


  • AF7101 Organic 85 Day

    $3.61 per lb
    Total (50.00000000 lbs): $180.50

    AF7101 Organic 85 Day Forage Sorghum Seed from Alta Seeds has good standability and superior digestibility a good double crop. Buy yours here!


  • AF7102 85-95 Day

    $3.84 per lb
    Total (50 lbs): $192.00

    AF7102 85-95 Day Forage Sorghum Seed from Alta Seeds is the earliest maturing type on the market with superior tillering. Buy yours here!


  • AF7201 93 Day

    $2.90 per lb
    Total (50 lbs): $145.00

    AF7201 93 Day Forage Sorghum Seed from Alta Seeds is the shortest season brachytic dwarf with more leaves and less stalk. Buy yours here!


  • AF7202 90-95 Day

    $3.84 per lb
    Total (50 lbs): $192.00

    Buy Alta Seeds AF7202 90-95 Day- AF7201 Forage Sorghum from Alta Seeds is a shorter statured and earlier version of the fuller season BMR 6 forage sorghums.


  • AF7301 108 Day

    $2.90 per lb
    Total (50 lbs): $145.00

    AF7301 108 Day Forage Sorghum Seed from Alta Seeds is a male sterile variety with low starch and very high sugar for great energy. Buy yours here!


  • AF7401 104 Day

    $3.84 per lb
    Total (50 lbs): $192.00

    AF7401 104 Day Forage Sorghum Seed from Alta Seeds is the newest generation hybrid with superior density and standability. Buy yours here!


  • Antler Chicory

    $7.88 per lb
    Total (25 lbs): $197.00

    Antler Chicory Seed is an excellent addition to livestock pasture mixes drought tolerant and highly palatable. Buy yours here!


  • AS6201

    $1.26 per lb
    Total (50 lbs): $63.00

    Alta Seeds AS6201 Sorghum Sudan is a proven variety with good early season vigor and regrowth and a low water requirement. Buy yours here!


  • AS6401

    $1.54 per lb
    Total (50 lbs): $77.00

    Alta Seeds AS6401 Sorghum Sudan has the highest disease resistance package for any Sorghum Sudan. Buy yours here!


  • AS6402

    $1.75 per lb
    Total (50 lbs): $87.50

    Alta Seeds AS6402 Sorghum Sudan is a brachytic where the space between leaves is much shorter providing more leave tonage than stock. Buy yours here!


  • AS6501

    $1.54 per lb
    Total (50 lbs): $77.00

    Alta Seeds AS6501 Sorghum Sudan is a BMR 6 gene with increased efficiency and 30%-50% less water requirements than corn silage. Buy yours here!


Showing 1–12 of 100 results